Publications - Communicable diseases

Communicable diseases related publications in the Health website.

Page last updated: 21 January 2018 (this page is generated automatically and reflects updates to other content within the website)

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PublicationYearStatusHealth topics

National position statement for the management of latent tuberculosis infection

The primary role of any tuberculosis (TB) control program is to ensure the prompt identification and effective treatment of active disease. The host immune system often succeeds in containing the initial (or primary) infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), but may fail to eliminate the pathogen. The persistence of viable organisms explains the potential for the development of active disease years or even decades after infection. This is known as latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) although, rather than a distinct entity, this probably represents part of a dynamic spectrum. Individuals with LTBI are asymptomatic and it is therefore clinically undetectable. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that one-third of the global population has been infected with Mtb, with highest prevalence of LTBI in countries/regions with the highest prevalence of active disease. In 2013, 88% of 1322 notifications in Australia were in the overseas-born population (incidence 19.5 per 100,000 v. 1.0 per 100,000), with this proportion rising over the course of the last decade. Combined with epidemiological evidence of low local transmission, this strongly implies that the vast majority resulted from reactivation of latent infection acquired prior to immigration. Contrasting trends in TB incidence in other developed countries probably reflect differences in policy regarding LTBI. Conclusion: The diagnosis and treatment of LTBI represents an important opportunity for intervention by jurisdictional TB control programs.

2017Current

The epidemiology of tuberculosis in the Australia Capital Territory, 2006-2015

This paper reviews surveillance data to describe the epidemiology of tuberculosis in the Australian Capital Territory over a 10 year period between 2006 and 2015.

2017Current

Australian Meningococcal Surveillance Programme, 1 April to 30 June 2017

The reference laboratories of the Australian Meningococcal Surveillance Programme (AMSP) report data on the number of cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) confirmed by laboratory testing using culture and by non-culture based techniques. Data contained in quar­terly reports are restricted to a description of the number of cases of IMD by jurisdiction and serogroup, where known. A full analysis of laboratory confirmed cases of IMD in each calen­dar year is contained in the AMSP annual reports.

2017Current

Annual report: surveillance of adverse events following immunisation in Australia, 2015

This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for 2015. It also describes reporting trends over the 16-year period 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2015.

2017Current

Tuberculosis screening in an aged care residential facility in a low-incidence setting

This is a retrospective cohort study of tuberculosis contact tracing and screening in an elderly residential facility in Victoria. In the absence of specific guidelines regarding an optimal test for this population, 18 residents were tested with both tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), and all underwent symptom assessment and chest x-ray (CXR).

2017Current

Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance (PAEDS) annual report 2015: Prospective hospital-based surveillance for serious paediatric conditions

This is the second of planned annual reports to Communicable Diseases Intelligence for Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance (PAEDS), a hospital-based active surveillance system for select serious paediatric conditions of public health importance. PAEDS has a focus on monitoring vaccine preventable diseases and adverse events following immunisation and in 2015 included surveillance for: acute flaccid paralysis; encephalitis; influenza; intussusception; pertussis; and varicella and zoster.

2017Current

2016 Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit Surveillance Report

The Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit (APSU) was established in to facilitate national active surveillance of uncommon rare childhood diseases, complications of common diseases or adverse effects of treatment. Currently APSU undertakes surveillance for rare infectious diseases or rare complications of more common infectious diseases including: acute flaccid paralysis (AFP, a surrogate condition for polio virus infection), congenital rubella, congenital cytomegalovirus, congenital or neonatal varicella, neonatal and infant herpes simplex virus, perinatal exposure to HIV and paediatric HIV infection, and juvenile onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis which is due to the human papilloma virus infection. Surveillance for severe complications of influenza began in 2008. Surveillance for microcephaly began in 2016 to identify potential case of congenital Zika virus infection. APSU data supports clinical and public health policy and surveillance for AFP contributes to Polio-Free certification by the WHO.

2017Current

National Tuberculosis Advisory Committee Guideline: Management of Tuberculosis Risk in Healthcare Workers in Australia

Tuberculosis (TB) is uncommon in Australia and not commonly managed by most healthcare workers (HCWs). However, even in a low incidence setting, occasional exposure of HCWs is inevitable and transmission of TB to HCWs leading to disease does occur. In addition, HCWs may have been recruited to Australia from countries with high TB incidence. These HCWs are more likely to be infected with TB before arrival and subsequently develop active disease while working in health settings in Australia. In 2001, there were 20 TB notifications in HCWs in Australia, of which 10 were born overseas, whereas in 2013, 70 of 77 notified cases (91%) were people born overseas.1, 2 Managing the risk of TB in HCWs is multifaceted. A combination of staff education, awareness, early diagnosis, appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE), environmental controls and screening procedures is required to minimise the risk of transmission to HCWs and from HCWs to patients. Prevention of nosocomial transmission from HCWs is particularly important in patients that are more vulnerable, for example children and the immunocompromised. This document aims to describe the components that are considered essential for all healthcare facilities in Australia to minimise this risk. It is not intended to be operational, and reference should be made to specific state and territory TB Control Program policies for this detail. Each facility should develop its own policy for the management of TB risk in HCWs according to this jurisdictional policy and the facility specific factors that determine risk, but it should include at least the following components.

2017Current

Sexually Transmitted Infections in Melbourne, Australia from 1918 to 2016: nearly a century of data

This paper describes the diagnoses of gonorrhoea, syphilis and chancroid attending a single sexual health service in Melbourne and fills a 40-year gap (1929-1969) in STI notifications for Australia.

2017Current

Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2014

In 2014, the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,339 tuberculosis (TB) notifications, representing a rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. Australia has achieved and maintained good tuber¬culosis (TB) control since the mid-1980s, sustaining a low annual TB incidence rate of approximately 5 to 6 cases per 100,000 population. The number of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases diagnosed in Australia is low by international standards, with approximately 1-2% of notifications per year being classified as MDR-TB. Australia’s overseas-born pop¬ulation continued to represent the majority (86%) of TB notifications and Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population continue to record TB rates around 6 times higher than the Australian born non Indigenous population. Whilst Australia has achieved excellent and sustained control of TB in Australia, sustained effort is still required to reduce rates further and contribute to the achievement of the World Health Organization’s goal to end the global TB epidemic by 2035.

2017Current

The effects of culture independent diagnostic testing on the diagnosis and reporting of enteric bacterial pathogens in Queensland, 2010 to 2014

This article discusses how the introduction of culture independent diagnostic testing into pathology laboratories in Queensland has impacted diagnosis and reporting of gastrointestinal illness. The article focuses on Salmonella, Campylobacter, Shigella and Yersinia, and shows that the incidence of all four pathogens increased after the introduction of culture independent diagnostic testing. While this change in testing improves detection of pathogens, it doesn’t provide a bacterial culture for further characterisation or antimicrobial susceptibility testing. It is recommended that laboratories continue to perform culture of specimens in addition to culture independent diagnostic testing.

2017Current

How much does tuberculosis cost? An Australian healthcare perspective analysis

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a disease of high morbidity in Australia, with implications for both public health and the individual. There is minimal published TB cost data in the Australian setting. We found the costs of managing latent TB to be far lower than in cases of active TB. A program designed to detect and treat latent TB (LTBI) to prevent subsequent disease may be cost effective in appropriately selected patients.

2017Current

Prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission: are we following guidelines?

This article describes the results of an audit investigating the hepatitis B vaccination completion outcomes and serological testing of infants in the Northern Territory who were born to mothers with hepatitis B infection. The results demonstrate that although adherence to the vaccination schedule in this group of infants was good, mechanisms for ensuring that infants receive serology testing need to be strengthened.

2017Current

Ensuring National Capacity in Genomics-Guided Public Health Laboratory Surveillance

This page contains a report of the Public Health Laboratory Network (PHLN) expert advisory group on whole genome sequencing.

2015Current

Foodborne illness in Australia: Annual incidence circa 2010

This page contains information on foodborne illness in Australia.

2014Current

Fourth National Hepatitis C Strategy 2014-2017

The Fourth National Hepatitis C Strategy 2014-2017 is one of five strategies aiming to reduce sexually transmissible infections (STI) and blood borne viruses (BBV), and the morbidity, mortality and personal and social impacts they cause.

2011Current

Infection Control Guidelines

This document provides recommendations for infection prevention and control procedures to minimise the risk of transmission of Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease (CJD) in health care settings.

2010Current

Guidelines for the public health management of gastroenteritis outbreaks due to norovirus or suspected viral agents in Australia

The Communicable Disease Network Australia (CDNA) formed a working group in 2005 in order to develop national guidance regarding outbreaks of norovirus and suspected viral gastroenteritis, in response to increasing reports of outbreaks. These Guidelines are designed to complement existing state and territory guidelines.

2010Current

The First National Hepatitis B Strategy

This strategy is the first national strategy on this disease to be adopted in Australia. It is also one of a suite of five strategies aiming to reduce the transmission of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and blood borne viruses (BBVs), and the morbidity, mortality and personal and social impacts they cause.

2010Current

National Strategies for blood-borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections

The COAG Health Council endorsed five new national strategies for blood-borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections in June 2014.

2010Current

Poliomyelitis Outbreak Response Plan for Australia

This document was compiled by the Office of Health Protection in the Department of Health.

2009Current

Hepatitis C Prevention, Treatment and Care: Guidelines for Australian Custodial Settings

A supplementary document to these Guidelines which provides further background to hepatitis C in custodial settings and expands on the evidence base for the Guidelines is available from the Department of Health. The supplementary document also includes appendices, additional reading and references.

2008Current

Hepatitis C Prevention, Treatment and Care: Guidelines for Australian Custodial Settings

The health and corrections sectors are committed to working jointly to strengthen the response to emerging public health issues in custodial settings.

2008Current

National Guidelines for the Management of People with HIV Who Place Others at Risk

These Guidelines have been developed by the Blood Borne Virus and Sexually Transmissible Infections Sub-Committee (BBVSS) of the Australian Population Health Development Principal Committee (APHDPC), to inform, support and harmonise approaches by Australia’s States and Territories to the management of people with HIV who place others at risk of HIV infection.

2008Current

Review of Innovative Health Services for Homeless Youth Program - Final Report 2007

The Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA or the “Department”) engaged Health Outcomes International (HOI) in February 2007 to undertake a review of the Innovative Health Services for Homeless Youth (IHSHY) program and to recommend future policy directions for the program.

2007Historical

Policy on antiviral prophylaxis and the implications for pathology and research staff

This position statement arises from a discussion session on antiviral use for laboratory staff working with H5/Pandemic Influenza A virus at the October 2006 face-to-face meeting of the Public Health Laboratory Network (PHLN).

2007Current

Communicable Diseases Intelligence - Current issue - September 2017

This issue contains three peer-reviewed articles and three annual reports as well as the regular quarterly data reports.

2006Current

The National Hepatitis C Strategy 2005-2008

The National Hepatitis C Strategy provides a foundation for national action that will guide Australia’s response to hepatitis C over the next three years.

2005Historical

National Sexually Transmissible Infections Strategy - 2005-2008

The National STIs Strategy provides a foundation for national action in the prevention and treatment of STIs in Australia.

2005Historical

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy 2005-2008: Revitalising Australia’s Response

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy 2005-2008 has identified five priority areas for action to be addressed over the life of the Strategy: development of a targeted prevention education and health promotion program for HIV; improving the health of people living with HIV/AIDS; developing an effective response to the changing care and support needs of people living with HIV/AIDS; a review of the National HIV Testing Policy; and the provision of a clearer direction for HIV/AIDS research.

2005Historical

Guidelines for the control of pertussis in Australia - Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report No. 1

The Communicable Diseases Network Australia advises that this first report in the Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report series is no longer current.

2005Current

An evaluation of the Tri-State HIV/STI Project 2001-2002

This page has a PDF document and contact details in relation to the Tri-state HIV/STI project (TSP).

2004Historical

Infection control guidelines for the prevention of transmission of infectious diseases in the health care setting, 2004 edition

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN RESCINDED.

2004Rescinded

Guidelines for Smallpox Outbreak, Preparedness, Response and Management

The guidelines provide technical information about the management of a threat, or an outbreak, of smallpox.

2004Current

The Australian Government Response to the 2002 Reviews of the National HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Strategies

The 2002 Reviews of the National HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Strategies evaluated two of the key public health strategies in Australia. The Australian Government Response to the 2002 Reviews of the National HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Strategies addresses the recommendations of the Reviews and outlines Government policy in relation to HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C and related issues.

2003Historical

2002 Reviews of the National HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Strategies and Strategic Research

In February 2002, Senator the Hon Kay Patterson, the Commonwealth Minister for Health and Ageing, requested independent reviews of the National HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Strategies to be undertaken concurrently with the quinquennial reviews of the NationalCentres in HIV Research.

2003Historical

Laboratory procedures and precautions for samples collected from patients with suspected viral haemorrhagic fevers

The purpose of these guidelines is to allow the necessary on-site testing for other possible causes of the illness, and other testing required for the immediate and ongoing management of the patient.

2002Current

Hepatitis C: Informing Australia's National Response

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN RESCINDED: Eight papers were commissioned to inform of the development of the National Hepatitis C Strategy 1999-2000 to 2003-2004. The papers span the areas of: clinical research, epidemiology, social and behavioural research, and virology and basic scientific research. This publication represents the technical core of the policy development process.

2000Rescinded

The National Hepatitis C Strategy 1999-2000 to 2003-2004

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN RESCINDED: The National Hepatitis C Strategy 1999-2000 to 2003-2004 was launched in June 2000 by the Federal Minister for Health and Aged Care. The Strategy has two primary aims to reduce the transmission of hepatitis C in Australia, and to minimise the personal and social impacts of hepatitis C infection.

2000Rescinded

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy 1999-2000 to 2003-2004: Changes and Challenges

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN RESCINDED: The National HIV/AIDS Strategy 1999-2000 to 2003-2004 builds on an important foundation established under previous HIV/AIDS Strategies - the partnership between and with affected communities, governments at all levels, and medical, scientific and healthcare professionals.

2000Rescinded

The management of HIV/AIDS: a resource guide for Indigenous primary health care organisations

This manual aims to increase awareness amongst health workers in Indigenous primary health care organisations of the needs of Indigenous people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS.

2000Historical

Hepatitis C prevention education for injecting drug users in Australia

In its concern with preventing the transmission of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), this research report examines Australia’s efforts to date in prevention education particularly among people who inject drugs.

1999Historical

Framework for an Australian Influenza Pandemic Plan - Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report No. 4

The Plan provides a strategic framework for the detection and management of an influenza pandemic in Australia. It provides a national framework and direction for the development of plans at the State/Territory and local level. This is the fourth report in the Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report series.

1999Current

Hepatitis C: a review of Australia's response

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN RESCINDED: The review documents the extent of the problem posed by Hepatitis C - in terms of the prevalence and incidence of infection, the economic costs to Australia, and the social impact of the disease; assesses the performance of the National Hepatitis C Action Plan and the Nationally Coordinated Hepatitis C Education and Prevention Approach; provides a broad analysis of the current national and State- and Territory-level responses to the epidemic; and recommendations on directions and priorities for national action.

1999Rescinded

Epidemiology of the hepatitis C virus - Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report No. 3

This report of the epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus summarises the state of knowledge to the end of 1998. The report is based upon extensive literature reviews and the compilation of a research register that identifies Australian studies. This is the third report in the Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report series.

1999Current

Discussion Document Towards a Fourth National HIV/AIDS Strategy April 1999

This paper is a discussion document provided for comment and consultation. The development of a fourth National HIV/AIDS Strategy will involve extensive consultation, which will take place around Australia during the second quarter of 1999.

1999Historical

Building on success 2: towards a national strategy for HIV/AIDS health promotion for gay and other homosexually active men

This document outlines priorities for maintaining leadership and partnerships in the continued promotion of HIV/AIDS health initiatives for gay and other homosexually active men. It proposes a change from health education to health promotion and provides strategic direction for future developments. It contains 23 recommendations.

1998Historical

Building on success 1: a review of gay and other homosexually active men's HIV/AIDS education in Australia

A national review of HIV/AIDS education for gay and other homosexually active men was conducted by the National Centre for Health Promotion. This document reports the findings of the review and was completed in August 1998

1998Historical

Building on success 3: the Commonwealth Government response to towards national strategy for HIV/AIDS health promotion for gay and other homosexually active men

This document outlines the Government's commitment to maintaining the success of HIV/AIDS health promotion for gay and other homosexually active men. It provides a response to each of the recommendations in Building on Success 2 and gives details of specific commitments to new projects and initiatives

1998Historical

Foodborne Disease: Towards reducing foodborne illness in Australia - Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report Series No. 2

The report identifies gaps in knowledge of foodborne disease and assesses the current trends in epidemiology, leading to recommendations to reduce foodborne disease on a national basis. The report encourages a multi-sector approach to the prevention, surveillance and control of foodborne diseases. This is the second report in the Communicable Diseases Intelligence Technical Report series.

1997Current

National Indigenous Australian's Sexual Health Strategy 1996-97 to 1998-99

The strategy provides a comprehensive approach to preventing the spread of HIV and other sexually transmissible infections in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. It recommends action in four priority areas: prevention; treatment, care and support; workforce issues; and research and data collection.

1997Historical

Valuing the past ... investing in the future- Evaluation of the National HIV /AIDS Strategy 1993-94 to 1995-96

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy 1993–94 to 1995–96 is Australia’s second National HIV/AIDS Strategy. The first Strategy operated from 1989 to 1993 and was evaluated in 1992. This evaluation report was requested by Federal Cabinet when it agreed to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy 1993–94 to 1995–96.

1995Historical