Growing a smoke-free story

Page last updated: 05 January 2017

State / Territory

Queensland

Funded Organisation

Metro South Hospital and Health Service, Queensland Health

Program Objectives

The aim of the Project is to grow a smoke-free story in Inala. The Project will adopt a holistic approach to smoking cessation and prevention of uptake during pregnancy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth.

The program aims to support smoking cessation and/or reduction amongst young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and will:
  • reduce barriers to smoking cessation within the target groups, by using a culturally-based whole of person approach to improve participants’ mental, physical, and social, cultural health and well-being; and
  • use an ecological focus to address contextual barriers, including the prevalence and normalisation of smoking in Indigenous communities.
An inclusive approach will be adopted whereby people older than the target group will also be supported by the existing cessation health professional at the South Queensland Centre for Excellence in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (CoE).

Target group/area

The project will target pregnant women aged 14-30 years attending the CoE group, their partners or key family members, and their social circles.

Research questions/objectives

This is an exploratory study that seeks to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of the project for increasing rates of smoking cessation and prevention of uptake during pregnancy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth.

The main objective is to undertake innovative implementation research and evaluation activities designed to add to the evidence base for what works to reduce smoking in the specified Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations with, or at risk of, high prevalence of tobacco use.

The overarching research question is to determine if a holistic and ecological approach to reducing barriers to smoking behavioural change decreases rates of smoking amongst young women pregnant with an Aboriginal baby, their partners, and their social circles.

Secondary, but related research questions include:
  • What are the features of value of a holistic and ecological intervention aiming to enable smoking reduction and/or cessation among young women pregnant with an Aboriginal baby, their partners and their social circles?
  • Is the model of case management used by the project officers able to support young women pregnant with an Aboriginal baby to reduce or quit smoking?
  • Is the holistic and ecological approach to reducing barriers to smoking behaviour change feasible and effective in the Inala Aboriginal community?
Program feasibility will be determined through levels of participation in the program, as well as participants’ satisfaction with the program. Program effectiveness will be determined through recorded changes in smoking behaviours amongst all participants.